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U.S. Travel President and CEO Roger Dow speaks to NPR Morning Edition’s Rachel Martin and David Greene about the Visit U.S. Coalition.

Asian American Hotel Owners Association President and CEO Chip Rogers recently spoke with Bloomberg’s Steve Potisk about the decline in the U.S. share of overseas travel over the past two years and the travel industry’s plans to reverse the trend through the Visit U.S. Coalition.

© 2018 Bloomberg L.P. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Washington – The International Franchise Association (IFA) today became the newest member of the Visit U.S. Coalition, a group of organizations and industries united in the goal of promoting international travel to the U.S. to grow the economy and create jobs. Working alongside the White House and Congress in support of American businesses, the Visit U.S. Coalition is committed to stimulating international travel in support of sustained economic growth.

“When international visitors come to the U.S., they support American businesses. By spending at hotels, restaurants, retail stores, and more, travelers are essential to creating jobs in our communities,” said IFA president and CEO Robert Cresanti. “The Visit U.S. Coalition’s message, that America is open for business, is IFA’s message, and we are proud to be a member.”

In 2015, the U.S. share of the global travel market fell for the first time in a decade, and has continued its decline. Simply put, more people are traveling globally, but less are choosing to visit the U.S – meaning that other countries are surpassing the U.S. and leading when it comes to international travel. If the U.S. has maintained market share in international inbound travel, it would have welcomed 7.4 million international visitors, seen $32.2 billion in spending, and had the opportunity to create 100,000 American jobs.

“The Visit U.S. Coalition is excited to add IFA to its roster of organizations that are fighting to increase economic activity and create jobs with international travel to the U.S.,” said Visit U.S. Coalition spokesman Amos Snead. “As an advocate for small and large franchises across the country, IFA understands what it takes for American businesses to prosper.”

IFA advocates for nearly 733,000 franchise establishments, which support nearly 7.6 million direct jobs, $674.3 billion of economic output for the U.S. economy and 2.5 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

In joining the Visit U.S. Coalition, IFA is adding its name to an impressive group of organizations working together to grow the economy through travel. Coalition members include: American Gaming Association, American Hotel & Lodging Association, American Resort Development Association, American Society of Association Executives, Asian American Hotel Owners Association, International Association of Exhibitions and Events, National Restaurant Association, National Retail Federation, Real Estate Roundtable, Society of Independent Show Organizers, Travel Technology Association, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and the U.S. Travel Association.

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The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last week that the country added 200,000 jobs in January, which exceeded expectations and marked 88 straight months of job growth; the unemployment rate has remained steady at 4.1 percent for the last four months—its lowest level in 17 years; average hourly wages for private sector workers climbed 2.9 percent on the year—the strongest year-over-year shift since June 2009—and 0.2 percent from the previous month.

Historically, a strong economy has spurred strong travel and tourism numbers that boost the hospitality real estate sector—led by domestic travel and buoyed by international travel, which has been a mainstay export for the U.S. for years.

Original article found here.

The numbers considered travelers’ spending on food, lodging, souvenirs, entertainment, and transportation during their trips. The spending drops in 2016 and 2017 marked the first time since 2002 and 2003 that international visitor spending in the U.S. fell for two consecutive years, according to the U.S. Travel Association.

The U.S. wasn’t as affordable last year as it has been in recent years for top visitor markets in Europe, Brazil, and Japan as the U.S. dollar continues to improve.

The U.S. Travel Association, in a statement, said that the international visitor spending slump is a stark contrast to 2010 to 2015 when such spending grew by 48 percent —more than twice as fast as the 21 percent increase in other exports of U.S. goods and services.

“Simply put, sustained declines in international visitor spending mean fewer U.S. jobs and less revenue for public services throughout states and local economies, said
Patricia Rojas-Ungár, U.S. Travel’s vice president for public affairs. “International travel is our country’s No. 1 service export, and 15.3 million American workers depend on a healthy travel industry for their employment.”

Original article found here.

Washington – Today, the Department of Commerce released 2017 data for international trade in goods and services, which according to travel industry analysis, reflects a 3.1 percent decrease in visitor spending over the past year—the second consecutive annual drop in 15 years. In response, the Visit U.S. Coalition released the following statement:

“Today’s release brings into sharp focus the urgent need to reverse the decline in international inbound travel to the United States,” said Visit U.S. spokesman Amos Snead. “The number of international travelers to the U.S. has been declining since 2015—and every year of decline represents billions of dollars lost, and that ripple effect is felt throughout the American economy. The Visit U.S. Coalition was formed to work with the Administration to increase international inbound travel, and thus increase economic growth. Through smart policies and a welcoming message, we can ensure that the United States is the most secure and most visited country in the world.

“The two-year falloff in international visitor spending tracks with America’s loss in long-haul market share, which fell from 13.6 percent to 11.9 percent between 2015 to 2017, while global travel volume increased 7.9 percent in the same period,” said Snead. “Around the globe, more people are traveling than ever before, and we cannot allow the U.S. to fall behind other nations in attracting international travelers. President Trump has made it a priority to shrink our trade deficit and growing inbound travel can play a big part of achieving that success.”

The Commerce Department reported today that following a 2.8 percent decline in 2016, spending by international visitors in the U.S. fell 3.1 percent in 2017 to a level or $149 billion — the lowest level since 2013. The declines in 2016 and 2017 in international visitor spending in the U.S. marked the first time since the 2002-2003 that this spending declined over two consecutive years. From 2015 to 2017, spending by international visitors declined by 5.8 percent, while other U.S. exports increased by 3.5 percent.

The overall trade surplus in travel was $70 billion in 2017 – down from $84 billion in 2016 – making it the smallest trade surplus since 2010.

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The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.

Washington – Visit U.S. Coalition spokesman Amos Snead issued the following statement in response to President Trump’s State of the Union:

“The economic gains touted by President Trump in tonight’s speech send the powerful message to the world that America is open for business. By bringing vetted international travelers to U.S. destinations, we can create American jobs and grow the economy. The Visit U.S. Coalition looks forward to working with the Trump Administration and Congress to lead the world when it comes to travel.”

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The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.
visituscoalition.com/

 

Washington – In advance of President Trump’s first State of the Union address, the Visit U.S. Coalition released “State of International Travel,” a video highlighting factors that have contributed to the recent decline in the United States’ share of the global travel market.

“Ahead of the President’s State of the Union, we want to make clear that international travel is key to long-term economic growth. It constitutes our second-largest export and directly supports 1.2 million American jobs,” said Visit U.S. Coalition spokesman Amos Snead.

Overall, global long-haul travel has increased since 2015, yet the U.S. share of the global travel market has fallen for the first time in a decade. Simply put, more people are traveling globally, but fewer people are choosing to visit the U.S. The decline in America’s share of the international travel market is equivalent to the loss of 7.4 million international visitors, $32.2 billion in spending – and 100,000 American jobs.

During the first year of the Trump presidency the economy grew by 2.3 percent. The Visit U.S. Coalition wants to build upon these strong gains by working with the administration to grow America’s share of international travel.

“By bringing vetted international travelers to U.S. destinations, we can stimulate international travel spending and create jobs. The Visit U.S. Coalition looks forward to working with the Trump Administration and Congress to lead the world when it comes to travel,” said Snead.

The Visit U.S. Coalition has formed around the belief that Americans want both security and a robust economy – and can have both. Working alongside the White House and Congress in support of American businesses, Visit U.S. is committed to making America the most secure and most-visited country in the world.

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The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.
visituscoalition.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 26, 2018
Contact: Andrea Riccio
Riccio@s3publicaffairs.com

 

Visit U.S. Coalition Applauds President Trump’s Commitment to Growing the United States Economy at Davos

Washington – The Visit U.S. Coalition applauded President Trump’s, pro-business, pro-travel statement at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

“President Trump used this opportunity to give the world a clear message – ‘America is open for business.’ By inviting international travelers to the U.S., we can show them what makes America great, bolster our economy, and grow jobs,” said Visit U.S. Coalition spokesman Amos Snead.

Since 2015, international travel to the United States has declined, while global travel has grown. The decline in the U.S. share of the international travel market is equivalent to the loss of 7.4 million international visitors, $32.2 billion in spending – and 100,000 American jobs.

“Through increased international travel to the United States, we can help achieve the Trump Administration’s stated goal of a 3 percent increase in GDP and make sure America is winning when it comes to travel. America is open for business and international travelers.” said Snead.

The Visit U.S. Coalition has formed around the belief that Americans want both security and a robust economy – and can have both. Working alongside the White House and Congress in support of American businesses, Visit U.S. is committed to making America both the most secure and most-visited country in the world.

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The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.

visituscoalition.com

Last week, a number of trade organizations launched the Visit U.S. Coalition, aiming to reverse the decline in inbound visitors to the U.S., where global-travel share fell from 13.6% to 11.9% from 2015 to 2017, even as overall global travel increased 7.9%. Roger Dow, CEO of the U.S. Travel Association (a founding group), explained to news editor Johanna Jainchill why the Trump administration needs to make inbound travel a priority.

Original article found here.

America and Turkey have something in common: They’re the only two countries to suffer from a decline in long-haul travel since 2015.

Top tourism destinations such as the U.K., Australia and Italy have all benefited from an increase in visitors during the last two years, but America and Turkey haven’t shared in the expansion, according to data from the U.S. Travel Association.

The sharp decline in foreign visitors to the U.S. has alarmed several industries that rely on tourism, ranging from hotels to retailers. So they’re banding together to create a new coalition called Visit U.S. that aims to reverse the two-year trend. President Donald Trump’s policies on immigration and his “America First” platform may be turning off foreign visitors, although the U.S. Travel Association pointed out that the decline began in 2015, well before Mr. Trump won the presidential election.

Original article found here.

Since the early days of his campaign, President Trump has identified the U.S. trade imbalance and the flight of jobs abroad as major economic concerns that his administration will address. To help meet these priorities, we hope he looks at one area of the economy with which he’s quite familiar: international travel.

Inbound travel is our country’s second-largest export, and international travelers are some of this country’s most valuable consumers. They spend billions of dollars annually at hotels, restaurants and retail stores while visiting destinations across the country. The benefits of these dollars stretch far beyond the travel industry itself, to a wide swath of economic sectors and to every corner of the country: in total, travel supports $2.3 trillion in economic output annually and 15.3 million American jobs.

Original article found here.

International tourism is growing at its fastest clip in seven years, but the U.S. is on pace for its sharpest drop in foreign travelers since the wake of the recession.

It’s a worrying trend for the travel and retail industries. International travelers tend to stay longer and spend more than their domestic counterparts.

In the first seven months of 2017, the U.S. took in 41 million international visitors, a 4 percent decline from the year-earlier period, according to the Commerce Department. That follows a more than 2 percent drop a year earlier.

Original article found here. 

A new travel industry coalition is urging the Trump administration to help stem a drop in international visitors.

As more international travelers decide to skip the United States, 10 business associations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Restaurant Association, have created a travel industry group aimed at reversing the growing unpopularity of the U.S. as a vacation destination.

Historically, the U.S. had only to sit back and let foreign tourists and their money roll in. Over the past few years, though, that gravy train has begun to dry up, a trend that accelerated as President Donald Trump began to make good on campaign promises to restrict immigration. As a result, businesses that make up the multibillion-dollar industry relying on that revenue have grown increasingly nervous.

Original article found here.

WASHINGTON—Trade groups representing thousands of businesses and millions of jobs on Tuesday announced the official launch of the Visit U.S. Coalition, whose aim is to partner with the Trump administration to reverse the decline in U.S. competitiveness for international travel dollars.

The dip in U.S. market share is a hindrance to the president’s economic goals, which the Visit U.S. coalition intends to help correct. Research prepared for Visit U.S. by the U.S. Travel Association shows that while global travel volume increased 7.9 percent from 2015 to 2017, the U.S. slice of that growing pie fell from 13.6 percent to 11.9 percent in the same period—the first drop after more than a decade of consistent growth.

 

If the U.S. had maintained its 2015 market share, its economy would have gained:

  • 4 million additional international visitors
  • $32.2 billion in additional spending
  • 100,000 additional jobs

“America is the best country in the world to visit, but we’re losing the competition for international travelers and the dollars they spend when they come here,” said U.S. Travel Association President and CEO Roger Dow, whose organization is a founding member of Visit U.S. “The Visit U.S. Coalition is founded on the principle that we can have strong security but at the same time welcome robust numbers of international business and leisure travelers. We can do both.

“Visit U.S. is committed to helping make the U.S. both the most-secure and most-visited country in the world.”

Founding members of the Visit U.S. Coalition include the:

  • American Gaming Association
  • American Hotel & Lodging Association
  • American Society of Association Executives
  • Asian American Hotel Owners Association
  • International Association of Exhibitions and Events
  • National Restaurant Association
  • National Retail Federation
  • Real Estate Roundtable
  • Society of Independent Show Organizers
  • U.S. Chamber of Commerce
  • U.S. Travel Association

The U.S. was one of only two destinations in the top dozen global markets to see a decline in long-haul inbound travel since 2015. The drop stands in stark contrast to other large economies around the world. Notable among the countries whose tourism shares have recently grown: France, Germany, Spain and China.

That trend bodes poorly for U.S. performance in trade and job creation. Travel is a Top 10 employer in 49 states and the District of Columbia, and international travel is the country’s No 1 service export and No. 2 export overall.

In the coming weeks, Visit U.S. will advance policy recommendations that support its shared objectives with the Trump administration.

“International visitors are of vital importance to the gaming industry and the United States economy,” said American Gaming Association President and CEO Geoff Freeman. “We are excited to partner with our peers in the business community and eager to work with the Administration and Congress to ensure that the United States is the world’s most secure, attractive and welcoming destination.”

“Travel and tourism is our country’s second largest export and we can’t afford to lose ground to other countries,” said American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) President and CEO Katherine Lugar. “Fewer visitors means fewer hotel stays, fewer meals eaten in our restaurants, fewer goods purchased in our retail stores, and fewer visits to our national attractions. It also means fewer American jobs and a loss to our economy. We are committed to working together with the Administration to balance a welcome message with strong security to ensure we don’t fall behind to other countries.”

“The U.S. economy is on the upswing, but we can grow even more by encouraging more travel to America,” said U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue. “Travel creates jobs and economic activity across a swath of industries and sectors as people visit the U.S. and spend their time and money with American businesses. The Chamber is proud to join with our partners in the business community to make the case for a renewed focus on travel as a driver of economic growth and American prosperity.”

“The National Restaurant Association supports the Visit U.S. Coalition’s efforts to promote tourism as one out of every five dollars spent in a restaurant is directly related to travel.” National Restaurant Association Senior Vice President of Public Affairs Steve Danon.

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The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.

https://www.visituscoalition.com/

The U.S. Travel Association (USTA) is launching a “Visit U.S.” coalition next week, through which multiple travel-related industries will communicate to the current administration the importance of reversing this decline in international travel and offering suggestions for how to do so.

USTA’s website says that there were 1.7 million fewer international visitors to the U.S. in the first seven months of 2017 as compared to those same months in 2016, and as a result, 40,800 jobs are at risk. Majority of these are in the hotel and food-service industries, where foreign tourism is often essential.

“Flourishing international travel is vital to President Trump’s economic goal of sustained 3 percent GDP growth, and the Visit U.S. coalition is being founded for the express purpose of helping him achieve it,” said U.S. Travel Association president and CEO Roger Dow.

Dow feels that the United States needs to take more care with regard to its tourism industry.

Original article found here.

NEW YORK — Travel industry representatives sounded an alarm Tuesday over declines in international tourism to the U.S. and announced plans to reverse the trend.

Organizers of the new Visit U.S. Coalition portrayed the decline as long-term, going back to 2015, and said they would work with the Trump administration to reverse the decline.

In a conference call Tuesday, coalition representatives said they’re not blaming Trump administration rhetoric and policies, though others in the travel industry have nicknamed the decline the “Trump Slump.”

Organizers cited factors like the strong U.S. dollar, complex visa requirements and low-cost air travel in other markets. Proposals to reverse the decline include smoother visa processing and more welcoming messages.

Original article found here. 

A coalition of trade organizations has joined forces to try and reverse the decline in international visitation to the U.S., where global travel share fell from 13.9% to 11.9% from 2015-2017, even as global travel volume increased 7.9%.

The Visit U.S. Coalition aims to partner with the Trump administration to tackle the dip, calling it a “hindrance to the president’s economic goals.” The coalition’s founding members include the U.S. Travel Association, American Hotel & Lodging Association, National Restaurant Association and U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Original article found here. 

President Trump’s statement about immigrants aren’t solely responsible for the drop in international travel to the U.S. but they’re not helping, according to members of a new industry coalition dedicated to promoting international tourism to the country.

The coalition, dubbed Visit U.S., formally launched Tuesday and is aimed at reversing a drop in international visitors to the U.S. since 2015. The group, which includes travel, retail, hotel and gaming industry leaders, says it hopes to work with the Trump administration to send out a message that visitors are welcome in the U.S.

Original article found here. 

The United States is open for business.

That’s the message a new industry group, the Visit U.S. Coalition, wants to send to other countries amid a decline in the number of international travelers coming to the United States.

The U.S. Travel Association, joined by nine other trade associations, is spearheading the effort, which centers on working with the Trump administration and getting agencies to collaborate on a common set of policies.

“We’ve looked at an administration that has been quite distracted with getting tax reform done” and working on health care, Roger Dow, the travel group’s chief executive, said Tuesday. “Now we think the time is right.”

Original article found here. 

While global travel volume increased 7.9 percent from 2015 to 2017, according to research
prepared for Visit U.S. by the U.S. Travel Association, the U.S. slice of that growing pie fell
from 13.6 percent to 11.9 percent during that time period – the first drop after more than a
decade of consistent growth. That decline is a hindrance to the administration’s economic
goals of 3 percent GDP growth, noted Roger Dow, U.S. Travel Association president and
CEO, in a teleconference on Tuesday.

While it might not be apparent to many, the country is experiencing steep losses in jobs and
economic activity as a result of the decline in inbound international
travel, said Dow. If the U.S. had maintained its 2015 market share, the
economy would have gained:

  • 7.4 million additional international visitors
  • $32.2 billion in additional spending
  • 100,000 additional jobs

Original article found here. 

The number of trips made by global travelers surged 7% last year, according to new projections from the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). Meanwhile, trips to the U.S. fell by about 4%.

The decline, which follows a 2% drop in 2016, allowed Spain to overtake the U.S. as the second-most visited country in the world. Spain welcomed an estimated 82 million visitors last year, up 9% from 2016. The number of trips to the U.S. was roughly 73 million.

Original article found here. 

Persuading international travelers to visit the United States never used to be difficult. But things have gotten a little more complicated.

According to the Commerce Department’s National Travel and Tourism Office, the number of international visitors in the first half of 2017 fell 4 percent from a year earlier. Those in the travel industry point to factors like a global market that gives tourists more possible destinations, the strength of the dollar and tightening visa restrictions.

They also say the messages coming from the Trump administration — the latest example being President Trump’s vulgar comment about Haiti and African nations — play a role.

“Although the policy of the administration has not been targeted towards tourists, per se, tourists around the world are asking themselves whether they’re welcome in the United States,” said Daniel Korschun, associate professor of marketing at Drexel University, who focuses on the intersection of advertising and politics. “That’s surely a factor in the sagging performance.”

This week, the United States Travel Association plans to announce that industry groups are forming the Visit U.S. Coalition in an attempt to combat the slump through advocacy, lobbying, advertising and other methods. Members include the American Gaming Association, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

Original article found here.

The U.S. Travel Association noted that the travel sector outperformed overall U.S. export growth during the prior five years; the industry generated an $87 billion trade surplus in 2016, without which the U.S. trade deficit that year would have been 17 percent higher. Overall, the U.S. travel industry supports 15.3 million unexportable American jobs. “For our country to have any hopes of closing the trade gap, international inbound travel must perform, simple as that,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of U.S. Travel. “After almost a decade and a half of relatively sustained post-9/11 recovery, since 2015 there’s been evidence that the country has gotten complacent with the policies needed to support this vital economic engine and job creator.”

Original article found here.

“For our country to have any hope of closing the trade gap, international inbound travel must perform, simple as that,” said U.S. Travel Association CEO Roger Dow. “After almost a decade and a half of relatively sustained post-9/11 recovery, since 2015 there’s been evidence that the country has gotten complacent with the policies needed to support this vital economic engine and job creator.” The numbers reverse what had been a spending increase on the part of international travelers. Although the number of visitors who came to the U.S. through June was down, spending was up 3%. The numbers come ahead of U.S. Travel’s launch on Jan 16 of the Visit U.S. Coalition, of which U.S. Travel is a founding member. U.S. Travel said the coalition “will bring together a broad cross-section of industries whose goal is to partner with the Trump administration to address the decline in international visitation.”

Original article found here.

Roger DOW, CEO of the U.S. Travel Association discusses the drastic drops in international travel to the United States. Dow states that the travel industry provides a great amount of jobs and impacts our country’s economy so it is important that we see a switch in numbers soon. Dow goes on to discuss the U.S. Coalition and how that is going to serve as a tool to boosting international travel to the United States.

Original video found here.

Facing a prolonged dip in international tourist visits, the U.S. Travel Association is gathering allies to make the case to the Trump administration that the travel industry needs friends in high places. U.S. Travel plans to launch the Visit U.S. Coalition, a group of organizations representing industries mostly outside of travel, later this month, as reported earlier by the Los Angeles Times. The coalition won’t have any consumer-facing messaging. Rather, the group will be aimed at opening more dialogue with the Trump administration, said Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the Washington, D.C.-based association.

Original article found here.

According to the U.S. Travel Association, international travelers spend around $4,300 when they visit the U.S. and stay an average of 18 nights. Overseas travel spending, amounting to $246 billion in 2016, directly supports about 1.2 million American jobs. Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Association, told the Los Angeles Times that the declining numbers are an “undeniable wake-up call” and that “we must turn this into a national priority.”

Original article found here.

U.S. Travel plans to launch the Visit U.S. Coalition, a group of organizations representing industries mostly outside of travel, later this month, as reported earlier by the Los Angeles Times. The coalition won’t have any consumer-facing messaging. Rather, the group will be aimed at opening more dialogue with the Trump administration, said Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the Washington, D.C.-based association. Multiple sectors have a stake in travel, said Grella, and too often different industries are competing for President Trump’s ear on an issue that might be impacting many. If multiple industries organized and presented a unified front on an issue such as decreased visitation to the United States, travel might have a better chance of being heard, said Grella.

Original article found here.

U.S. Travel Association Chief Executive Roger Dow has called the government data “deeply concerning … to anyone who cares about the economic well-being of the United States” and said “correcting this troubling trend needs to become a national priority.” A new industry coalition, Visit U.S., is planning to highlight the contributions of foreign tourists, who according to the trade group generated $246 billion in spending in 2016 and directly support 1.2 million jobs.

Original article found here.

The U.S. Travel Association will soon launch a new coalition to encourage foreign visitors to travel to the U.S. after a sharp decline last year in the number of tourists and business travelers entering the country, the Los Angeles Times reported Tuesday.

“Visit US” plans to deliver the message that the U.S. welcomes foreign visitors, Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs at U.S. Travel, told the newspaper. Details of the coalition will be unveiled in coming weeks, he added.

The number of foreign visitors traveling to the U.S. declined 4 percent during the first six months of 2017 compared with the same time period the previous year, according to government figures. Some in the travel industry have blamed President Donald Trump, saying his travel ban on travelers from some Muslim-majority countries and his nationalist rhetoric have convinced many foreigners that the U.S. doesn’t welcome outsiders. However, the L.A. Times also noted the U.S. dollar’s growing strength against other currencies and new airport security measures may also be to blame.

Original article found here.

International travelers generated $246 billion in spending in 2016 according to the U.S. Travel Assn., the trade group for the nation’s travel industry. About half of all foreign visitors to the U.S. come from Mexico and Canada, with the rest coming from Europe, Japan, China and Brazil, among other countries.

Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Assn., said the declining visitor numbers are an “undeniable wake-up call that we must turn this into a national priority.”

The trade group plans to launch a coalition with other U.S. industries, called “Visit USA,” he said. The goal is to send the message that the U.S. welcomes international visitors, Grella said, adding that the travel group plans to announce details of the coalition in the next few weeks.

He declined to blame Trump’s anti-immigration diatribes for the decline in visitors but said “a very big portion of the coalition’s work is to promote more balanced rhetoric.”

“We want to get to the place that the administration says we are closed for terrorism but open for business,” Grella said.

Original article found here.

With international visitation to the U.S. continuing to decline, travel industry leaders say they plan to form a coalition of American businesses to send the message that the country welcomes foreign tourists.

In the first six months of the year, international visitors to the U.S. dropped 4% to 41 million visitors compared to the same period in 2016, according to the latest data from the National Travel and Tourism Office. It marks a change of direction for visitation numbers, which had been surging for a few years.

Travel leaders have placed part of the blame for the decline on Donald Trump, who launched his presidential campaign by criticizing immigrants from Mexico and later pushed for a ban on travel from several largely Muslim countries.

Other experts attribute the slowdown to the strength of the U.S. dollar compared to many foreign currencies and new security measures on air travel to the U.S.

International travelers generated $246 billion in spending in 2016 according to the U.S. Travel Assn., the trade group for the nation’s travel industry. About half of all foreign visitors to the U.S. come from Mexico and Canada, with the rest coming from Europe, Japan, China and Brazil, among other countries.

Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Assn., said the declining visitor numbers are an “undeniable wake-up call that we must turn this into a national priority.”

The trade group plans to launch a coalition with other U.S. industries, called “Visit USA,” he said. The goal is to send the message that the U.S. welcomes international visitors, Grella said, adding that the travel group plans to announce details of the coalition in the next few weeks.

He declined to blame Trump’s anti-immigration diatribes for the decline in visitors but said “a very big portion of the coalition’s work is to promote more balanced rhetoric.”

“We want to get to the place that the administration says we are closed for terrorism but open for business,” Grella said.

A representative for the White House didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Original article found here.

TRAVEL BUDDIES: A new coalition has launched to focus on inbound travel to the United States. “Our collective aim is to spotlight the value of international travel to the Trump administration and encourage a shift in tone and policy to better facilitate secure travel to America,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, in a video posted to Twitter on Friday.

Original article found here.