Tag: US Travel.

Since this post's publication, data has been updated. To view current international travel data review here


WASHINGTON—Trade groups representing thousands of businesses and millions of jobs on Tuesday announced the official launch of the Visit U.S. Coalition, whose aim is to partner with the Trump administration to reverse the decline in U.S. competitiveness for international travel dollars.

The dip in U.S. market share is a hindrance to the president’s economic goals, which the Visit U.S. coalition intends to help correct. Research prepared for Visit U.S. by the U.S. Travel Association shows that while global travel volume increased 7.9 percent from 2015 to 2017, the U.S. slice of that growing pie fell from 13.6 percent to 11.9 percent in the same period—the first drop after more than a decade of consistent growth.

 

If the U.S. had maintained its 2015 market share, its economy would have gained:

  • 7.4 million additional international visitors
  • $32.2 billion in additional spending
  • 100,000 additional jobs

“America is the best country in the world to visit, but we’re losing the competition for international travelers and the dollars they spend when they come here,” said U.S. Travel Association President and CEO Roger Dow, whose organization is a founding member of Visit U.S. “The Visit U.S. Coalition is founded on the principle that we can have strong security but at the same time welcome robust numbers of international business and leisure travelers. We can do both.

“Visit U.S. is committed to helping make the U.S. both the most-secure and most-visited country in the world.”

Founding members of the Visit U.S. Coalition include the:

  • American Gaming Association
  • American Hotel & Lodging Association
  • American Society of Association Executives
  • Asian American Hotel Owners Association
  • International Association of Exhibitions and Events
  • National Restaurant Association
  • National Retail Federation
  • Real Estate Roundtable
  • Society of Independent Show Organizers
  • U.S. Chamber of Commerce
  • U.S. Travel Association

The U.S. was one of only two destinations in the top dozen global markets to see a decline in long-haul inbound travel since 2015. The drop stands in stark contrast to other large economies around the world. Notable among the countries whose tourism shares have recently grown: France, Germany, Spain and China.

That trend bodes poorly for U.S. performance in trade and job creation. Travel is a Top 10 employer in 49 states and the District of Columbia, and international travel is the country’s No 1 service export and No. 2 export overall.

In the coming weeks, Visit U.S. will advance policy recommendations that support its shared objectives with the Trump administration.

“International visitors are of vital importance to the gaming industry and the United States economy,” said American Gaming Association President and CEO Geoff Freeman. “We are excited to partner with our peers in the business community and eager to work with the Administration and Congress to ensure that the United States is the world’s most secure, attractive and welcoming destination.”

“Travel and tourism is our country’s second largest export and we can’t afford to lose ground to other countries,” said American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) President and CEO Katherine Lugar. “Fewer visitors means fewer hotel stays, fewer meals eaten in our restaurants, fewer goods purchased in our retail stores, and fewer visits to our national attractions. It also means fewer American jobs and a loss to our economy. We are committed to working together with the Administration to balance a welcome message with strong security to ensure we don’t fall behind to other countries.”

“The U.S. economy is on the upswing, but we can grow even more by encouraging more travel to America,” said U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue. “Travel creates jobs and economic activity across a swath of industries and sectors as people visit the U.S. and spend their time and money with American businesses. The Chamber is proud to join with our partners in the business community to make the case for a renewed focus on travel as a driver of economic growth and American prosperity.”

“The National Restaurant Association supports the Visit U.S. Coalition’s efforts to promote tourism as one out of every five dollars spent in a restaurant is directly related to travel.” National Restaurant Association Senior Vice President of Public Affairs Steve Danon.

###

 

The Visit U.S. Coalition represents a broad cross-section of industries that have come together to address the decline in international travelers to the U.S. and resulting opportunity cost to the U.S. economy and jobs.

https://www.visituscoalition.com/

Since this post's publication, data has been updated. To view current international travel data review here


The U.S. Travel Association (USTA) is launching a “Visit U.S.” coalition next week, through which multiple travel-related industries will communicate to the current administration the importance of reversing this decline in international travel and offering suggestions for how to do so.

USTA’s website says that there were 1.7 million fewer international visitors to the U.S. in the first seven months of 2017 as compared to those same months in 2016, and as a result, 40,800 jobs are at risk. Majority of these are in the hotel and food-service industries, where foreign tourism is often essential.

“Flourishing international travel is vital to President Trump’s economic goal of sustained 3 percent GDP growth, and the Visit U.S. coalition is being founded for the express purpose of helping him achieve it,” said U.S. Travel Association president and CEO Roger Dow.

Dow feels that the United States needs to take more care with regard to its tourism industry.

Original article found here.

Since this post's publication, data has been updated. To view current international travel data review here


NEW YORK — Travel industry representatives sounded an alarm Tuesday over declines in international tourism to the U.S. and announced plans to reverse the trend.

Organizers of the new Visit U.S. Coalition portrayed the decline as long-term, going back to 2015, and said they would work with the Trump administration to reverse the decline.

In a conference call Tuesday, coalition representatives said they’re not blaming Trump administration rhetoric and policies, though others in the travel industry have nicknamed the decline the “Trump Slump.”

Organizers cited factors like the strong U.S. dollar, complex visa requirements and low-cost air travel in other markets. Proposals to reverse the decline include smoother visa processing and more welcoming messages.

Original article found here. 

A coalition of trade organizations has joined forces to try and reverse the decline in international visitation to the U.S., where global travel share fell from 13.9% to 11.9% from 2015-2017, even as global travel volume increased 7.9%.

The Visit U.S. Coalition aims to partner with the Trump administration to tackle the dip, calling it a “hindrance to the president’s economic goals.” The coalition’s founding members include the U.S. Travel Association, American Hotel & Lodging Association, National Restaurant Association and U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Original article found here. 

President Trump’s statement about immigrants aren’t solely responsible for the drop in international travel to the U.S. but they’re not helping, according to members of a new industry coalition dedicated to promoting international tourism to the country.

The coalition, dubbed Visit U.S., formally launched Tuesday and is aimed at reversing a drop in international visitors to the U.S. since 2015. The group, which includes travel, retail, hotel and gaming industry leaders, says it hopes to work with the Trump administration to send out a message that visitors are welcome in the U.S.

Original article found here. 

The United States is open for business.

That’s the message a new industry group, the Visit U.S. Coalition, wants to send to other countries amid a decline in the number of international travelers coming to the United States.

The U.S. Travel Association, joined by nine other trade associations, is spearheading the effort, which centers on working with the Trump administration and getting agencies to collaborate on a common set of policies.

“We’ve looked at an administration that has been quite distracted with getting tax reform done” and working on health care, Roger Dow, the travel group’s chief executive, said Tuesday. “Now we think the time is right.”

Original article found here. 

While global travel volume increased 7.9 percent from 2015 to 2017, according to research
prepared for Visit U.S. by the U.S. Travel Association, the U.S. slice of that growing pie fell
from 13.6 percent to 11.9 percent during that time period – the first drop after more than a
decade of consistent growth. That decline is a hindrance to the administration’s economic
goals of 3 percent GDP growth, noted Roger Dow, U.S. Travel Association president and
CEO, in a teleconference on Tuesday.

While it might not be apparent to many, the country is experiencing steep losses in jobs and
economic activity as a result of the decline in inbound international
travel, said Dow. If the U.S. had maintained its 2015 market share, the
economy would have gained:

  • 7.4 million additional international visitors
  • $32.2 billion in additional spending
  • 100,000 additional jobs

Original article found here. 

The number of trips made by global travelers surged 7% last year, according to new projections from the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). Meanwhile, trips to the U.S. fell by about 4%.

The decline, which follows a 2% drop in 2016, allowed Spain to overtake the U.S. as the second-most visited country in the world. Spain welcomed an estimated 82 million visitors last year, up 9% from 2016. The number of trips to the U.S. was roughly 73 million.

Original article found here. 

The U.S. Travel Association noted that the travel sector outperformed overall U.S. export growth during the prior five years; the industry generated an $87 billion trade surplus in 2016, without which the U.S. trade deficit that year would have been 17 percent higher. Overall, the U.S. travel industry supports 15.3 million unexportable American jobs. “For our country to have any hopes of closing the trade gap, international inbound travel must perform, simple as that,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of U.S. Travel. “After almost a decade and a half of relatively sustained post-9/11 recovery, since 2015 there’s been evidence that the country has gotten complacent with the policies needed to support this vital economic engine and job creator.”

Original article found here.

“For our country to have any hope of closing the trade gap, international inbound travel must perform, simple as that,” said U.S. Travel Association CEO Roger Dow. “After almost a decade and a half of relatively sustained post-9/11 recovery, since 2015 there’s been evidence that the country has gotten complacent with the policies needed to support this vital economic engine and job creator.” The numbers reverse what had been a spending increase on the part of international travelers. Although the number of visitors who came to the U.S. through June was down, spending was up 3%. The numbers come ahead of U.S. Travel’s launch on Jan 16 of the Visit U.S. Coalition, of which U.S. Travel is a founding member. U.S. Travel said the coalition “will bring together a broad cross-section of industries whose goal is to partner with the Trump administration to address the decline in international visitation.”

Original article found here.