Tag: US Travel.

Roger DOW, CEO of the U.S. Travel Association discusses the drastic drops in international travel to the United States. Dow states that the travel industry provides a great amount of jobs and impacts our country’s economy so it is important that we see a switch in numbers soon. Dow goes on to discuss the U.S. Coalition and how that is going to serve as a tool to boosting international travel to the United States.

Original video found here.

Facing a prolonged dip in international tourist visits, the U.S. Travel Association is gathering allies to make the case to the Trump administration that the travel industry needs friends in high places. U.S. Travel plans to launch the Visit U.S. Coalition, a group of organizations representing industries mostly outside of travel, later this month, as reported earlier by the Los Angeles Times. The coalition won’t have any consumer-facing messaging. Rather, the group will be aimed at opening more dialogue with the Trump administration, said Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the Washington, D.C.-based association.

Original article found here.

According to the U.S. Travel Association, international travelers spend around $4,300 when they visit the U.S. and stay an average of 18 nights. Overseas travel spending, amounting to $246 billion in 2016, directly supports about 1.2 million American jobs. Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Association, told the Los Angeles Times that the declining numbers are an “undeniable wake-up call” and that “we must turn this into a national priority.”

Original article found here.

U.S. Travel plans to launch the Visit U.S. Coalition, a group of organizations representing industries mostly outside of travel, later this month, as reported earlier by the Los Angeles Times. The coalition won’t have any consumer-facing messaging. Rather, the group will be aimed at opening more dialogue with the Trump administration, said Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the Washington, D.C.-based association. Multiple sectors have a stake in travel, said Grella, and too often different industries are competing for President Trump’s ear on an issue that might be impacting many. If multiple industries organized and presented a unified front on an issue such as decreased visitation to the United States, travel might have a better chance of being heard, said Grella.

Original article found here.

International travelers generated $246 billion in spending in 2016 according to the U.S. Travel Assn., the trade group for the nation’s travel industry. About half of all foreign visitors to the U.S. come from Mexico and Canada, with the rest coming from Europe, Japan, China and Brazil, among other countries.

Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Assn., said the declining visitor numbers are an “undeniable wake-up call that we must turn this into a national priority.”

The trade group plans to launch a coalition with other U.S. industries, called “Visit USA,” he said. The goal is to send the message that the U.S. welcomes international visitors, Grella said, adding that the travel group plans to announce details of the coalition in the next few weeks.

He declined to blame Trump’s anti-immigration diatribes for the decline in visitors but said “a very big portion of the coalition’s work is to promote more balanced rhetoric.”

“We want to get to the place that the administration says we are closed for terrorism but open for business,” Grella said.

Original article found here.

With international visitation to the U.S. continuing to decline, travel industry leaders say they plan to form a coalition of American businesses to send the message that the country welcomes foreign tourists.

In the first six months of the year, international visitors to the U.S. dropped 4% to 41 million visitors compared to the same period in 2016, according to the latest data from the National Travel and Tourism Office. It marks a change of direction for visitation numbers, which had been surging for a few years.

Travel leaders have placed part of the blame for the decline on Donald Trump, who launched his presidential campaign by criticizing immigrants from Mexico and later pushed for a ban on travel from several largely Muslim countries.

Other experts attribute the slowdown to the strength of the U.S. dollar compared to many foreign currencies and new security measures on air travel to the U.S.

International travelers generated $246 billion in spending in 2016 according to the U.S. Travel Assn., the trade group for the nation’s travel industry. About half of all foreign visitors to the U.S. come from Mexico and Canada, with the rest coming from Europe, Japan, China and Brazil, among other countries.

Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Assn., said the declining visitor numbers are an “undeniable wake-up call that we must turn this into a national priority.”

The trade group plans to launch a coalition with other U.S. industries, called “Visit USA,” he said. The goal is to send the message that the U.S. welcomes international visitors, Grella said, adding that the travel group plans to announce details of the coalition in the next few weeks.

He declined to blame Trump’s anti-immigration diatribes for the decline in visitors but said “a very big portion of the coalition’s work is to promote more balanced rhetoric.”

“We want to get to the place that the administration says we are closed for terrorism but open for business,” Grella said.

A representative for the White House didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Original article found here.

TRAVEL BUDDIES: A new coalition has launched to focus on inbound travel to the United States. “Our collective aim is to spotlight the value of international travel to the Trump administration and encourage a shift in tone and policy to better facilitate secure travel to America,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, in a video posted to Twitter on Friday.

Original article found here.